Sunday, December 18, 2011

Show me the money !!

It is getting close to the end of another calendar year,  All sole-proprieters will be counting there piles of money ... or maybe not??  What was 2011 really like for you?

Just barely holding on...or did you discover something new.   A new way of doing business or a new product that is driving your ROI wild?

If you are happy with the results of YOUR 2011 - tell us about it in the comments section.

If YOUR 2011 was less than stellar - tell us what YOU think happened.

What will YOU change in 2012?


HELPING BUSINESSES MAKE A PROFIT - IT IS YOUR PAY CHEQUE !

Do you need more productivity in your business?

Tips to grow your business

Small business HR

Here is a new social media idea that you can use in your business - The Hive.
Download the whitepaper, by filling in your contact information.  Used by permission of Lawrence Pilch at Pollstream!  Thanks, Lawrence!


1.  I love to be appreciated ... and so do YOUR employees....
      Joy Vas, CHRP - HRNC


2.  Tell your employees what they did right - and be specific....
      1001 Ways to Reward Employees - Money isn't Everything by Bob Nelson


3.  Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power....
     Abraham Lincoln

Let us know what you need.  Contact.

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Fatal accidents in the workplace.

Small Business HR
Fatal accidents - does anyone have the actual numbers with ages available?
My experience in the Niagara Region has been young workers and lack of training when working with machinery or around machinery. ex: Boom truck operator hits overhead power line and 18 year old killed by touching electrified truck; or Take Your Kid to Work Day at (John Deere-now closed) 14 year olds driving gator in yard (no training) hit the transport bed backing up to dock. Examples of deaths in the workplace - not injuries. They are still happening. I do not know the age of the electrician who was recently killed at the GM plant when crushed by a crane against pipes - probably still under investigation. What is happening? Workers are still dying on the job - not just loosing fingers in a saw! Am I the only one aware of this? Have the safety procedures been taught? They were not taught to the dead 18 year old and neither were they taught to the 14 year old. There have been many changes in safety procedures since two of these deaths. But an electrician still died - May he rest in peace and God be with his family.
Comment from LinkedIn Poll on Canadian HR Law

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Accessible customer service standard for AODA effective January 1, 2012

QUICK FACTS

  • Accessible customer service is as simple as making some small changes and training your staff to serve customers of all abilities, such as:
  • Accommodating a customer's service dog.
  • Writing down the answer to a question for someone who is Deaf.
  • Using plain language and speaking in short sentences when helping someone with a developmental disability.
  • More than 1.85 million Ontarians have a disability and this number is quickly rising as the population ages.
  • By 2017, for the first time, Ontarians aged 65 and over will account for a larger share of the population than children aged 0-14.

Friday, December 2, 2011

Oxford Plastics Inc. Fined $50,000 After Worker Injured

Oxford Plastics Inc. Fined $50,000 After Worker Injured

November 30, 2011
Woodstock, ON - Oxford Plastics Inc., a manufacturer of plastic products, was fined $50,000 for a violation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act after a worker was injured.
On March 19, 2010, at the company's Embro, ON facility, a worker was making an adjustment to a machine that held large coils of plastic tubing. The worker was underneath the plastic tubing when one of the coils fell off. The worker was struck and injured. A second worker was also injured trying to assist the first.
A Ministry of Labour investigation found that the coils had not been secured against tipping or falling.
Oxford Plastics Inc. was found guilty of the following:
  • Failing to ensure that the coils of plastic tubing were secured against tipping or falling
  • Failing to take the reasonable precaution of securing or blocking the motion of the coils while a worker was underneath
  • Failing to take the reasonable precaution of conducting a hazard analysis on the machine in question
The fine was imposed by Justice Thomas McKeogh. In addition to the fine, the court imposed a 25-per-cent victim fine surcharge, as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Small-business human resources: In-house or outsource?

November 28, 2011 | Proquest LLC
By Ryan, Jim T   
  

REGION

Small businesses have a number of options for human resources services, but it's not always clear-cut as to whether an in-house, hands-on approach or a professional, outsourced strategy is the best way.

A company's size, resources and executive involvement in hiring are large factors in determining a strategy, human resources professionals said. But even if they do it themselves, some small companies may want to outsource human resources to professionals more familiar with rules and regulations to prevent problems and save money, they said.

For companies with fewer than 25 people, it might be best to work with an expert, said Christina Myers, president of the Lancaster County Association for Human Resource Management. She's also a senior human resources manager for Minnesota-based Scantron Corp., the data collection and standardized testing company that has a printing facility in West Hempfield Township.
"It's more cost-effective than hiring full-time HR staff ," Myers said.

Human resources encompasses more than hiring, firing and employee disputes, she said. There's also benefits management, unemployment insurance and accompanying regulations. Small-company owners may not have the expertise to handle those, she said.

Growing companies have more options, but also more responsibility to comply with regulations in the U.S. such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act, she said.   "That adds a layer of complexity," Myers said. "It's a lot to know and a lot to take care of, and you need someone who is an expert or has a strong grasp of the laws. That way you're doing what's right and not putting the company at risk."

Many small companies prefer handling their human resources issues in-house, executives said.
"If you keep everything organized and keep up on it, then it's not that hard to do," said Willie Erb, CEO of E&E Metal Fabrication Inc. "If you slack, then you'll find yourself in trouble."
Lebanon-based E&E has 23 employees and within the next year could begin hiring more to ramp-up production of industrial biomass burners that can provide electricity to manufacturers and offices. In February, it landed a contract to research, develop and build the burners for Florida-based Starlight Energy.

Even when E&E begins hiring for that production - expected to double its workforce - it plans to review candidates and make decisions for itself, Erb said.

Many owners want full control over those issues to make sure the people they hire fit with their corporate culture and values, Myers said. If companies use a third party for staffing, they must ensure that the consultant also understands those values, she said.

"Any time you outsource to someone, the company still has the liability," said Kimberly Nash, director of human resources services for Cumberland County-based Alpha Benefits Group. "So you have to make sure that whoever you're working with has a good reputation, that you're comfortable with them."

Executives considering whether to outsource should weigh the workload of their staff members managing human resources, she said.

Sometimes, outside factors force a small company's hand. The most recent recession and its lingering economy are good examples. The comatose economy has left many small companies understaffed, with each manager taking on much more responsibility than they would have in a ripe economy.

York-based Wagman Metal Products Inc., a manufacturer of manual and automatic tools and parts for the cement industry, has experienced such issues, said Jeff Snyder, the company's sales and marketing manager.

The cement industry was down about 60 percent without commercial and residential construction, he said. Wagman had to cut back, too. In 2007, it employed between 30 and 40 people, he said. Today, its workforce is between 15 and 20 people.

Everyone is wearing multiple hats and taking on more responsibility, Snyder said. That means it has to cut back where it can, so the company uses a staffing agency to find workers on an as-needed basis, he said.

"Its definitely more cost-effective to have some consultants do something in these areas every once in a while, as opposed to having a full-time staff person," Snyder said.

Companies looking to save additional money while getting more value from their outsourced services need to evaluate those business relationships, Nash said. If brokers and consultants aren't managing your human resources issues, or you only see them around renewal time, it's time to think about making a change, she said.

Small-company executives also have to look at what third-party firms are offering in terms of added service at no additional cost, she said. Many firms offer extras, and they can help better manage a business without hiring more consultants, she said.

"You should get service," Nash said, "and feel confident that what they're telling you is the real way it is."

"If you keep everything organized and keep up on it, then it's not that hard to do. If you slack, then you'll find yourself in trouble."

Willie Erb, E&E Metal Fabrication Inc.
BY JIM T. RYAN
jimr@journalpub.com
Copyright:(c) 2011 Journal Publications Inc.


Friday, November 25, 2011

www.hrnc.ca-Company and Supervisor Fined $171,000 Total After Worker Injured

Company and Supervisor Fined $171,000 Total After Worker Injured

November 22, 2011
Windsor, ON - ThyssenKrupp Industrial Services Canada Inc., carrying on business as ThyssenKrupp Hearn Division, a provider of warehousing, packaging and transportation services, was fined $160,000 for a violation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act after a worker was injured. Don Hearn Jr., a supervisor, was fined $11,000 in relation to the same incident. On February 25, 2009, a worker was doing electrical upgrades at the company's warehouse on Sprucewood Ave. in Windsor. As the worker was removing conductors from an electrical panel, a bare conductor touched the side of the electrical panel, causing an arc flash. The worker sustained serious electrical burns.
A Ministry of Labour investigation found that the electrical panel was not disconnected from the power source, locked out or tagged before the work started.
ThyssenKrupp Industrial Services Canada Inc., carrying on business as ThyssenKrupp Hearn Division, was found guilty of failing to ensure that the electrical panel was disconnected, locked out and tagged prior to work being done on it. Don Hearn Jr. was found guilty of the same.
The fines were imposed by Justice of the Peace Robert Gay. In addition to the fines, the court imposed a 25-per-cent victim fine surcharge, as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

 

 

Thursday, November 17, 2011

The Convictions Archive lists persons who were convicted of an offence under the ESA and/or its regulations for the months listed

Convictions Archive

The Convictions Archive lists persons who were convicted of an offence under the ESA and/or its regulations for the months listed below. This includes some Offence Notices (tickets) under Part I of the Provincial Offences Act (POA), summons under Part I of the POA and prosecutions under Part III of the POA.
Information about convictions under the Employment Standards Act, 2000, are posted on the Ministry of Labour website for one year from the date of posting and then removed from the website.

Ontario is transforming the province’s health and safety system and increasing protection for workers.

NEWS
Ministry of Labour

Strengthening Workplace Health And Safety
McGuinty Government Implementing Recommendations of Expert Safety Panel

NEWS
May 18, 2011

Ontario is transforming the province’s health and safety system and increasing protection for workers.
In the largest revamp of Ontario’s worker safety system in 30 years, a series of new amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Workplace Safety and Insurance Act have passed. These amendments are in response to the recommendations provided by the Expert Panel on Occupational Health and Safety and will:

Establish the Ministry of Labour as the lead for accident prevention, transferring it from the WSIB.

Appoint a new Chief Prevention Officer to coordinate and align the prevention system.

Create a new prevention council, with representatives from labour, employers, and safety experts, to advise the Chief Prevention Officer and the Minister.
The changes also give the Minister of Labour oversight of the province's Health and Safety Associations as well as the education, training and promotion of workplace health and safety.
QUOTES
“We all have the same goal – to make sure all workers go home safe and healthy at the end of the day. These amendments will help prevent injuries and create productive workplaces - and that’s good news for all Ontarians.”
— Charles Sousa, Minister of Labour
QUICK FACTS

Headed by Tony Dean, the expert panel received more than 400 responses in over 50 meetings with stakeholders across the province.

The panel included representatives from labour, employers, and academia with workplace health and safety expertise.

LEARN MORE

Find out more about what Ontario is doing to protect workers.
Greg Dennis, Minister's Office, 416-326-7710
Matt Blajer, Communications Branch, 416 326-7405
ontario.ca/labour-news
Disponible en fran├žais

Ontario has a new number for workplace health and safety incidents, unsafe practices and general inquiries.

Health and Safety Contact Centre
1-877-202-0008



NEWS
Ministry of Labour

Strengthening Workplace Health And Safety
McGuinty Government Implementing Recommendations of Expert Safety Panel

NEWS
May 18, 2011

Ontario is transforming the province’s health and safety system and increasing protection for workers.
In the largest revamp of Ontario’s worker safety system in 30 years, a series of new amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Workplace Safety and Insurance Act have passed. These amendments are in response to the recommendations provided by the Expert Panel on Occupational Health and Safety and will:

Establish the Ministry of Labour as the lead for accident prevention, transferring it from the WSIB.

Appoint a new Chief Prevention Officer to coordinate and align the prevention system.

Create a new prevention council, with representatives from labour, employers, and safety experts, to advise the Chief Prevention Officer and the Minister.
The changes also give the Minister of Labour oversight of the province's Health and Safety Associations as well as the education, training and promotion of workplace health and safety.
QUOTES
“We all have the same goal – to make sure all workers go home safe and healthy at the end of the day. These amendments will help prevent injuries and create productive workplaces - and that’s good news for all Ontarians.”
— Charles Sousa, Minister of Labour
QUICK FACTS

Headed by Tony Dean, the expert panel received more than 400 responses in over 50 meetings with stakeholders across the province.

The panel included representatives from labour, employers, and academia with workplace health and safety expertise.

LEARN MORE
Find out more about what Ontario is doing to protect workers.
Greg Dennis, Minister's Office, 416-326-7710
Matt Blajer, Communications Branch, 416 326-7405
ontario.ca/labour-news
Disponible en fran├žais